www.batangtoru.org | Reptile and Amphibian
279
page-template,page-template-full_width,page-template-full_width-php,page,page-id-279,page-child,parent-pageid-16044,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-title-hidden,qode-theme-ver-10.0,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.12,vc_responsive

Between 2003-2015 a total of 23 locations were surveyed for Amphibian and Reptile species in the Batang Toru Ecosystem, during which 142 species were recorded. Most of these surveys were carried out in the West Forest Block and additional surveys, especially in the East Forest Block, will likely yield more species!

REPTILES & AMPHIBIANS

Several rare and exciting species were encountered which deserve to be highlighted:

  • A new frog species, the Nauli dwarf frog (Chiromantis nauli) was encountered in the Batang Toru forest (Riyanto & Kurniati 2014).
  • The unique, very rare and endemic legless lizard, Wegner’s Glass lizard (Anguidae: Dopasia wegneri) was encountered several times. This species was only known from the type specimen collected in the 1950s in the Padang highlands (Mertens 1959).
  • Several other Sumatran endemics were encountered, including the frogs Calluella voltzi, Chiromantis nauli, Rhacophorus barisani, and R. catamitus.
  • The enigmatic and beautiful Ornate Brown Snake (Xenelaphis ellipsifer) is a rarely encountered species inhabiting montane areas, and has been documented several times in Batang Toru. It reportedly occurs at elevations of 800 metres or higher, and is only known from primary rainforest habitat. It is predominantly aquatic in habits, but little else is known of this species.
  • Two rare and endangered tortoises, the Brown Tortoise (Manouria emys) and the Spiny Terrapin (Heosemys spinosa) were found in the Batang Toru forest. Both are listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List.
  • The rare and endangered frog Kalophrynus punctatus, listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List, was also encountered during the surveys in Batang Toru. To date the species has only been found on the Mentawai islands in Sumatra, and parts of Borneo.
  • The venomous mountain pit viper, Ovophis monticola, not well known from Sumatra was encountered several times in the Batang Toru forest.